19 October 2016

2 Minutes with Jonathan Warren

We spoke to the Director of Nursing and Deputy Chief Executive, Jonathan Warren about his experience of QI and why he thinks it’s so important for the Trust…

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COULD YOU GIVE US A BRIEF SUMMARY OF YOUR ROLE AND WHAT A TYPICAL DAY AT WORK IS FOR YOU?

I am the Director of Nursing and the Deputy Chief Executive – One of the joys of the job is that there isn’t a typical day, although there are some things that I try to do every week such as visit at least one team to find out how things are going, make contact with staff who have been a victim of violence to check they are OK and to review all the incidents reports.

 

 

WHAT DO YOU ENJOY MOST ABOUT YOUR ROLE?

Hearing from staff and patients about their experience of the Trust and working together to make things better for both staff and patients

 

WHAT DO YOU DO IN YOUR DAY-TO-DAY WORK TO SUPPORT US TO CONTINUALLY IMPROVE?

As a leader in the organisation I think my role is to try to create an environment in which our staff can thrive, so they can do what they do best; delivering fantastic care to our patients – I try to listen carefully to each and every staff member I meet and respond in the way I would want to be responded to.

 

DO YOU THINK IT IS IMPORTANT FOR THE LEADERS OF THIS TRUST TO EMBRACE QUALITY IMPROVEMENT? WHY?

Yes – because if we are not improving the quality of care that we are delivering it is getting worse

 

WHAT WOULD YOU SAY TO SOMEONE WHO FEELS THAT QI IS A BOX TICKING EXERCISE AND IS UNSURE ABOUT THE BENEFITS OF QI TO US AS A WHOLE TRUST AND THEMSELVES INDIVIDUALLY?

I would encourage them to look at the fantastic work that some of the QI projects are delivering – be that around reduction in pressure ulcers, quicker access to services, reduction in violence on our wards or just some of the safer care that is being delivered. I would ask them to listen with fascination to some of the patient stories about how high quality care has made a difference to their lives. In terms of themselves I would want them to talk to staff who are actively involved in QI projects and to hear the joy of making things better for our patients

 

DO YOU HAVE A STORY OF SOMETHING INSPIRING THAT HAS OCCURRED THROUGH QI?

I guess for me the most inspiring thing was when I did the Improvement Science In Action training; having the privilege of working with some of the staff from the Older Persons Directorate to create the kernel of the project that was to develop into the violence reduction project at the Lodge. To work closely with such a dedicated enthusiastic and compassionate group of staff was a real privilege – to be at the Nursing Times award ceremony when they won a national award was just fabulous!

 

WHAT DO YOU SEE AS THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE TO EMBED QUALITY IMPROVEMENT, AND WHAT CAN WE DO TO TACKLE THIS?

I guess it is trying to help people find their way through some of the conflicting priorities on QI/CQC targets and money – I think we need to revisit the issue of what we can allow people not to do to make time and space for QI

 

WHERE DO YOU SEE US AS A TRUST IN 3 YEARS’ TIME / HOW DO YOU SEE THE ROLE OF QI IN THE TRUST AS WE MOVE FORWARD?

I would to see us maintaining our outstanding CQC rating and supporting other organisations to improve the quality of care they deliver. I see QI as the central methodology for this

 

FINALLY, COULD YOU SUM UP WHAT QUALITY IMPROVEMENT MEANS TO YOU AND WHY YOU FEEL IT IS SO IMPORTANT TO US AS A TRUST TO EMBRACE.

Quality Improvement means listening and learning from our staff and patients, developing and empowering our staff to make changes in the way they deliver care for our patients and supporting them to do so.

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